Have Any Books been Lost or Added to the Bible?

Without mentioning the details of early church “fathers” and early manuscript collections that affirm the 27-book collection to have existed before the 4th century, the Bible overwhelming shows that the Apostles oversaw the collection of the New Testament writings. Paul instructed the sharing of His writings in Colossians 4:16, and warned against false writings in 2 Thessalonians 2:1-2, 3:17.

In short, 2 Peter 3:16 shows that all of Paul’s epistles were collected as Scripture and spread into lands not specifically addressed. Paul quoted Luke 10:7 as “scripture” along with Deuteronomy in 1 Tim. 5:18. With the Gospel of Luke confirmed as Scripture, then the book of Acts is certainly Scripture along with the written Gospels mentioned by Luke in Luke 1:1-3 are too. Second Peter 1:16-21 shows that the writings of the Apostle John and Peter were already Scripture. John also affirmed inspired Scripture written by the Apostles in 1 John 1:1-4. The Apostles did oversee the collection. Read more here “The Formation of the New Testament“.

Some false teachers will affirm the inspiration of the Scriptures, and yet undermine the authority of the Scriptures by teaching that the New Testament Scriptures were collected in a 4th century council. These teachers would have you believe that the writings of the New Testament were not intended for all Christians.

Many false teachers even many conservative assume that men gathered the New Testament together in the 4th century, and many of them would even hide this belief from their fellowship. From this presumption, some say that 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus are not inspired or even written by Paul. Some may refer to Clement of Rome’s letter to the Corinthians or to other spurious “gospels” written in other centuries as though these have been cut out while never added or inspired in the first place. Such is bias. Many simply want to encourage doubt to persuade people to be cynical towards the reliability of even Jesus’ own words. This doubt undermines the infallibility of Christ, God’s providence in preserving Scripture, and denies that the Bible is complete in beliefs and practices. This allows the false teachers to assume an authority that is not theirs.

Such doubt disregards God and His ability to providentially sustain the words of Christ especially those words given to the Apostles and prophets. There is nowhere else to find Jesus’ words but in the Bible. Jesus said that His words will never pass away (Matt. 24:35, Mark 13:31, Luke 21:33). Do not doubt that the most profound and sublime words ever written are in pristine and pure order being preserved by God.

About Scott J Shifferd

Minister, church of Christ in Jacksonville, FL. Husband and father of four. Email: ScottJon82[at]yahoo.com
This entry was posted in Christian, Scriptures and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

23 Responses to Have Any Books been Lost or Added to the Bible?

  1. Pingback: The Astounding Origin of the Christian Bible | Seeing God's Breath

  2. We shouldn’t generalize any body of believers especially in a growing post-denominational world.

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  3. “Regarding the Laodicean letter. From the text it seems the most likely explanation that it was letter written by the person speaking to the Laodicean Church.”
    *Not in Greek, the letter is simply “the one out of” Laodicea. This letter could be Galatians since Galatians was written before Colossians. Colossians is a prison epistle and Galatians is not, so Galatians is agreed to be before Colossians by all scholarly introductions that I know. The letter out of Laodicea could be 1 Corinthians or 2 since these were specific and general letters. Paul wrote to “all those who in every place call upon the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, both their Lord and ours:” (1 Cor. 1:2b).

    The Apostles laid out the index of books as the NT Bible. The Scriptures above the show the formation of the collection under the oversight of the Apostles.

    Where do the Apostles refer to Jasher and not possibly to another source or oral tradition that resembles Jasher?

    The lower or capitol “c” is not offensive. It is the derogatory abbreviation used is a number of condescending and filthy ways and smacks of denominating. Many in spite use “coc” to not refer to the churches as “of Christ”. “CoC” did not originate from us though some immature members use it. We’re offend by “church-of-Christers” too.

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    • HeathEater says:

      — “Where do the Apostles refer to Jasher and not possibly to another source or oral tradition that resembles Jasher?” —-

      Both times it appears in the bible.

      Joshua 10:13 : . . .”Is not this written in the book of Jasher?”

      2 Samuel 1:18: . . ..”behold, it is written in the book of Jasher.”

      Seems pretty clear to me. . .

      ========================

      — “*Not in Greek, the letter is simply “the one out of” Laodicea. ” —

      The words can be interpreted as “letter written to the Laodiceans”, but also “letter written from Laodicea.” The NASB translates this verse in the latter manner, and translations in other languages such as the Dutch Statenvertaling translate it likewise: “When this letter is read among you, have it also read in the church of the Laodiceans; and you, for your part read my letter {that is coming} from Laodicea.”

      — “The Apostles laid out the index of books as the NT Bible. ” —

      Really? Where did they do this? In what verse would I find this?

      There is an index in the Bible written by the apostles?

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      • Exactly, the NT does not refer to the book of Jasher. As shown before, referring to other sources do not make them inspired just truthful. If the book of Jasher is guided by the Spirit, then it is included in one of the books of the OT.

        No, the words cannot be interpreted “the letter written from the Loadicians”. Neither the NASV or the translation you presented say “written to the Laodiceans”.

        The NT is the index. Just as the OT is an index to Jesus.

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        • HeathEater says:

          — “Exactly, the NT does not refer to the book of Jasher.” —-

          And this changes what about what I said? Do you mean to infer that the OT is not inspired?

          ——————————-

          — “No, the words cannot be interpreted “the letter written from the Loadicians”.”

          That is your opinion, but they can most certainly be interpreted “and you, for your part read my letter . . .”

          ————————————–

          — “The NT is the index. ” —

          The NT is the index to itself? How does that work?

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          • The Apostles oversaw the collection of the NT, and that is how the NT is the index. It is the collection.

            It is impossible to translate Col. 4:16 using the word “written” that does not appear in the text. “Read the letter from Loadocia.” You’re reading into the text (eisegesis). This shows bias and prejudice on your part. Lets consider this in honesty.

            Jasher is a book of reference in the OT. If it is a part of the OT, then it is from the Spirit, and if not, then it is not from the Spirit but a book of reference like the pagan poet in Acts 17.

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  4. answeringthechurchesofchrist says:

    The English word, “church”, is an erroneous translation of the Greek word, “ecclesia’, which only means a group or assembly. It carries NO religious connotation what-so-ever. To single out a descriptive term, and use it as a title, is to give God’s called out people a title that He did not authorize. Many Church of Christ members try to evade the issue by using the lower case “c” in “church of Christ’. This is a well known fact, not something meant to be offensive. Most all conservative Church of Christ churches use “c” – least the ones I know.

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    • I agree with this man that church means “assembly” in Greek, but that does not make “church” an incorrect translation. The word “church” does have unscriptural connotations from the world. “Assembly” is better than “church”, but “congregation” is the best in showing the meaning of “ekkleisia”. Disagreeing over these terms is nothing short of word-wrangling. As soon as, terms are changed then so will meaning, so lets stick with the Bible. “Assembly” (ekkleisia) does have religious meaning. It is used in the Bible as such. Acts 19 does show the pagan use of the term, “ekkleisia”, lawful and unlawful assemblies of the pagan world.

      Lower case “c” is used for congregations and the capital “C” for the “Church”. This is very legalistic conclusion reached right here by this person. Who would be offended by the lowercase “c”? “coC” is offensive. It is classifying us apart from our identity.

      Also, pronouncing “ekkleisia” as “ecclesia” show ignorance of the language to those who read ancient Greek.

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      • HeathEater says:

        — “Disagreeing over these terms is nothing short of word-wrangling. As soon as, terms are changed then so will meaning, so lets stick with the Bible.” —

        I agree, but I didn’t start this, you did. I was simply attempting to show you respect, as other people in the “CoC” have asked to be abbreviated as “coC.”

        If you want to be really “legal” about it, the bible never says “Church of Christ” it only says “churches of Christ.”

        But again, I don’t really care. It’s not important, beyond not offending you, which I never intended to do.

        — “Also, pronouncing “ekkleisia” as “ecclesia” show ignorance of the language to those who read ancient Greek.” —

        Are you implying that you read Greek? I was under the impression that “ekklesia” was the proper transliterated spelling, not “ekkleisia”

        Why even make comments like this? Are you trying to put him down or “offend” him?

        Your missing “s” on “shows,” in a sentence meant to put someone down, show”s” your ignorance of the English language.

        See how useful that is?

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  5. HeathEater says:

    If I was trying to be offensive I wouldn’t have prefaced the entire statement with:

    “First let me state that if I am wrong about something you believe please forgive me.”

    I promise you, were I trying to be offensive it would be clear.

    ——–

    Regarding the Laodicean letter. From the text it seems the most likely explanation that it was letter written by the person speaking to the Laodicean Church.

    I have heard before that it may be the book of Ephesians, however there is one, fundamental flaw with this theory.

    The epistle to the Ephesians was written AFTER Colossians.

    ——–

    Regarding the canon. You said “There is no manuscript evidence to present a canon other than the 27 books.”

    That’s not what I asked you though is it?

    The book of Jasher is referenced by the apostles twice in the bible. It obviously was at least of some merit for them to do so.

    Which begs the question what is canonical?

    My question still remains, being that Jesus nor the apostles ever laid out an index of the books of the bible for us, how are we to know what books belong there?

    ———

    If I offended you for using the abbreviation “coC” to refer to the “church of Christ” I’m truly sorry. There was no malice intended. I was under the impression after speaking with others in the Church of Christ that the c in church is not meant to be capitalized.

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